Tag Archives: memory care

WSI Engages with United Methodist Communities at “The Shores” For Brand & SEO Development

In its continuing mission to bring the “Abundant Life” to New Jersey’s senior citizens, United Methodist Communities at The Shores in Ocean City New Jersey, has partnered with WSI to deliver website management, Search Engine Marketing, and content development services. The goal is to enhance brand recognition for The Shores in southern NJ and drive awareness of UMC’s unique offering in the Assisted Living Community marketplace around the state.  (https://theshores.umcommunities.org)

WSI had developed the rebranded website and consulted on the design and development of the ongoing online marketing program, which is focused on SEO and statewide brand recognition.  New marketing initiatives include both paid search and organic search optimization, custom content creation, and ongoing paid advertising initiatives for the Community.

Marketing United Methodist Communities At The Shores

As long-standing experts in the digital marketing associated with assisted living and senior care services across the country, WSI has helped dozens of local assisted living facilities and nursing homes find new clients in their local area’s. Key to the rise in occupancy attributed to WSI efforts, is both the increase in visibility and the compelling content produced by WSI that understands the unique selling proposition of the brand. Crafting this messaging and bringing out the best UMC has to offer has been instrumental to creating a sales funnel through their digital properties that exceeded all previous attempts at digital marketing.

To market Assisted Living at The Shores, all unique services and aspects of the facility must be analyzed and presented. This coupled with a deep understanding of the types of clients that use or influence the use of assisted living, and their buying journey, allows us to craft content and programs that keep the brand in the right places, in the right way, at the right time.

WSI markets independently all of the senior care services available at the shores including Alzheimer’s and memory carehospice carerespite care, rehabilitation and nursing home services in New Jersey.

The WSI Assisted Living Marketing Model

WSI Brand development services for this client includes advanced SEO services as part of its “Semantic Mapping” approach to on-page SEO.  With this approach a comprehensive study of local product demand is conducted and mapped into a strategic architecture for the company website and all company web properties.  Quality Blog, graphic and video content is created and syndicated on external web properties including TumblrWordPress and BlogSpot in addition to dozens of other social media and content hubs.

WSI’s Elite Regional Branding program is comprehensive.  By carefully customizing this content strategy through on-page and off-page activities, WSI has achieved amazing results through a highly conservative approach that has proved resistant to changes in Google’s search algorithm’s and even improved client visibility as less reputable SEO approaches cause competitors to disappear from Search Engine Visibility.

For further details on WSI’s capabilities and strategies around the marketing of assisted living communities, or more generally around SEO, SEM, Paid Search, and content programs, please contact us for a free analysis and consultation.

Original content posted on http://winm-nj.com/the-shores-assisted-living-nj/

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A Portrait of In-Home Care for Memory Impaired Adults

With over 5.5 million Americans living with dementia-related health conditions that affect memory, like Alzheimer’s, in-home care services are becoming a popular choice for families who require assistance for their loved ones, but want to stay in the comfort of their own homes. Here’s some insight into how these care services work, from one of New Jersey’s leading home health agencies.

What services can a home health aide provide? 

This will depend on the agency you choose, but it’s recommended that you look for one which can offer caregivers skilled and experienced in dealing with dementia and Alzheimer’s patients.Their senior care services should include:

  • Memory care. These routine-based therapeutic programs are based around your loved one’s mental strengths, requirements and unique needs. They can include everyday routines, fitness programs, music therapy and sensory stimulation by trained caregivers and therapists.
  • Companion services. These services focus on providing your loved one with company, assistance in socializing and general supervision.
  • Personal services. These can include all personal hygiene and grooming activities that your loved one may need help with, like bathing, dressing and more.
  • Home services. This can include light housekeeping, shopping, meal preparation and managing appointments.
  • Skilled nursing care. This includes medication management, wound care, physical therapy, health monitoring, coordinating between medical specialists and more, as required by your loved one.

A typical day of home healthcare for the elderly with dementia 

Because these conditions affect memory and patients can easily become confused and distressed, a typical day of home care focuses on routine. By approaching the day step-by-step from setting the table and eating food to setting aside certain times for socialization, therapy and other activities, caregivers can work with patients and prioritize their quality of life. In their supervisory role, caregivers encourage patients to hold onto and exercise a comfortable level of independence while ensuring their physical safety and well-being. Your home health aide will also monitor and report changes in health and well-being, and communicate between family and medical specialists, if required.

Speak to the specialists at United Methodist Communities for expert dementia home care 

At United Methodist Communities in New Jersey, we strive to offer the very best quality senior care options, from assisted living to in-home care through our HomeWorks program. This program assists the elderly in the comfort of their own homes and provides their families and caregivers with personalized, compassionate care that prioritizes health, happiness and independence. We can assist you with respite care, overnight care, hourly or live-in care, as well as provide experienced care for Alzheimer’s and dementia patients.

For more information on our home health aide services, please contact us today at https://homeworks.umcommunities.org/.

Original content posted on https://homeworks.umcommunities.org/blog/portrait-home-care-memoryimpaired-adults/

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The Different Stages of Dementia and How They’re Treated

Dementia is a name given to a group of diseases, including Alzheimer’s, that cause the deterioration of memory and other cognitive functions. Here is some insight into how these diseases generally progress and how care needs increase over time, from Alzheimer’s care specialists in South Jersey.

Symptoms of mild dementia 

People with mild dementia can often  function fairly independently and care for themselves, as they generally experience less severe symptoms of the disease. They may suffer memory loss around recent events (long-term memory is often unaffected), get lost or lose items, experience trouble organizing or expressing thoughts, forget words or struggle with complex problems like managing their bills.

In some cases, personality changes may also occur and the person may become withdrawn or isolated. Although symptoms may be mild, it’s important for families to start considering additional support for their loved ones, either through family caregiving or assisted living communities that offer Alzheimer’s and dementia support.

Symptoms of moderate dementia

In the next stage of the disease, moderate dementia,, people require more help to manage their symptoms and daily lives. They typically experience increased confusion and poor judgement, more significant memory loss (including loss of long-term memory) and changes in their sleeping pattern. This stage of dementia affects the ability to cope with personal daily activities like dressing and bathing, as well as household chores, cooking and maintenance.

Often, significant personality changes occur at this stage, and sufferers often feel agitated, suspicious and even aggressive. Caregivers need to understand how to minimize these symptoms, as well as deliver the necessary support and compassionate care to ensure a high quality of life.

Symptoms of severe dementia 

As the most advanced stage of dementia, severe declines occur in mental and physical health. This stage commonly results in the loss of communication abilities and physical capabilities like walking, sitting, and bladder and bowel control. Patients at this stage require constant, specialist assistance 24 hours a day for all their physical and medical needs, especially as they often become more susceptible to infections like pneumonia.

Compassion, care and community in our beautiful assisted living facility in South Jersey 

The Shores, part of United Methodist Communities, offers memory care support services andassisted living communities specifically for individuals with Alzheimer’s and dementia,  providingan environment that delivers the highest quality of life. Professional staff assesses each resident and designs a program that is unique to their needs and level of independence, focusing on everyday routines like cooking, gardening, socializing, setting the table and living a community lifestyle. These memory care programs also include activities for general wellness like fitness, music and other sensory activities suited to your loved one’s enjoyment.

Our residences are designed to be comfortable and home-like, encouraging independence while supplying essential support and onsite medical care. For more information on our memory support services for individuals with Alzheimer’s and dementia, please contact us today.

Original content posted on https://umcommunities.org/blog/different-stages-dementia-theyre-treated/ 

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Memory games that promote healthy brains

Memories play an important role in forming who we are but, as we age, certain dementia conditions can start to erode these vital building blocks of our relationships, knowledge and personality. Conditions like Alzheimer’s, vascular dementia and Lewy body dementia currently have no cure, but there are ways to fight against memory loss, help exercise your brain and keep neurological pathways firing and responding properly, say memory care services specialists in Gloucester County, New Jersey.

Sudoku: This Japanese numbers game has gained a popular following in recent decades, with people of all ages enjoying the challenge. Using a grid of nine by nine spaces or cells, you fill the grid using the numbers 1 to 9, never using them more than once vertically, horizontally or within the 3×3 subgrids. This is a great way to exercise patience, pattern recognition and the process of elimination. They range from easy beginner’s games up to more difficult challenges, so it’s easy to try and see if you enjoy it. Most newspapers publish a few puzzles and there are books of Sudoku challenges as well as free puzzles online.

Crossword puzzles: A traditional favorite, these challenges are good for exercising memory recall and problem solving. They are available in different formats and sizes that offer unique challenges, including simple or easy clue formats or the more difficult indirect or cryptic clues. Sometimes, they follow different themes, including pop culture, literature, sports, history, or a combination of themes. Try out the crosswords in your local paper for a quick memory training session.

Apps and games: For a slightly more advanced take on brain training, you can use a wide range of programs on computers, tablets or smartphones. Many of them, like Lumosity, have been developed by neuroscientists, making them engaging as well as offering practice training for your brain.

Puzzles: These come in a wide range of sizes and complexity and many people enjoy doing them with a friend as well as on their own. Puzzles form useful therapy tools for memory care residents, helping to rebuild problem solving skills as well as encouraging memory stimulation and participation. If you are looking for a puzzle for a loved one with a memory condition, a therapist will be able to help you choose one that provides optimal stimulation without causing frustration.

Education: While this isn’t a memory game, learning new things is pivotal to keeping your brain fit and active. Attending guest lectures, enrolling in classes and clubs, and reading new books will all help your brain to form new, healthy neural pathways.

Expert memory care and support services in our assisted living community
Pitman is a senior living and assisted living community in Gloucester County, New Jersey. As part of United Methodist Communities, we’re dedicated to providing our residents with the highest quality of life possible through our compassionate care and professional services. As part of our services, we offer memory support to those with Alzheimer’s and dementia, promoting dignity and independence while meeting each person’s individual needs.

For more information about our assisted living community or memory care services, please contact us today or arrange a visit to our premises.

Original content posted at https://umcommunities.org/blog/memory-games-promote-healthy-brains/

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Understanding different types of dementia

Dementia is a term that covers a category of diseases and conditions that primarily cause memory loss through physical changes to the brain. Here’s a guide to the different conditions in this category:

  • Alzheimer’s disease: The most common type of dementia, Alzheimer’s accounts for between 60 and 80% of dementia conditions. It has been known to cause short-term memory loss, confusion, apathy, behavior changes, depression, decreased communication skills and decreased judgment. This is the result of beta-amyloid protein deposits (known as plaques) or twisted tau proteins (tangles) in the brain cells that lead to nerve cell damage and cell death.
  • Parkinson’s disease: A progressive disease that affects movement, it can lead to dementia symptoms similar to those of Alzheimer’s. Parkinson’s disease is caused by the development of clumps of alpha-synuclein protein deep within the brain that lead to nerve degeneration.
  • Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: Caused by a deficiency of vitamin B1, this disease often affects alcoholics. This vitamin plays an important role in brain function and nerve cells cannot function properly without it, leading to severe memory loss.
  • Huntington’s disease: This is caused by a defective gene on Chromosome 4, which results in abnormal brain proteins. Over time, this disease worsens, leading to involuntary movements, a decline in thinking and reasoning abilities, irritability and mood changes.
  • Normal pressure hydrocephalus: Caused by a buildup of fluid in the brain, patients experience memory loss, as well as difficulty with urinary control and walking.
  • Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Known as ‘mad cow disease,’ this fatal brain disease can be transmitted to people in certain circumstances, impairing memory and coordination.
  • Frontotemporal dementia: Little is known about this category of diseases, which includes primary progressive aphasia and Pick’s disease, as there is currently a lack of research-based evidence to link each case. These conditions affect the front and sides of the brain and include symptoms such as personality changes, difficulty with language and behavioral changes.

Memory care and support services from assisted living specialists

At United Methodist Homes of New Jersey, we understand that caring for a loved one who has Alzheimer’s or dementia can be stressful and emotionally draining, and as the disease progresses it may become impossible for you to manage without qualified support.

This is why we offer specialist memory support and care services specifically geared toward assisting Alzheimer’s and other dementia residents. By focusing on providing onsite customized care plans and activities within our comfortable apartment-style community, we help ensure your loved one maintains his or her dignity and quality of life.

To find out more about our services for Alzheimer’s patients, please contact the nearest UMH today:

UMH Bristol Glen in Sussex County, NJ: (973) 300-5788

UMH Collingswood Manor in Camden County, NJ: (856) 854-4331

UMH Francis Asbury Manor in Monmouth County, NJ: (732) 774-1316

UMH Pitman Manor in Gloucester County, NJ: (856) 589-7800

UMH The Shores in Cape May County, NJ: 609-399-8505

 

For more information, visit www.umh-nj.org.

 

This content was originally posted at http://www.umh-nj.org/blog/understanding-different-types-of-dementia/

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What are the essential do’s and don’t’s of dementia care?

If you have a loved one with dementia, it’s important to know how to handle any challenges you may face when socializing with or caring for them. Here is some great advice from assisted living specialists in New Jersey.

How to manage aggression in dementia patients

It’s common for caregivers and loved ones to be confronted by aggression – verbally or physically – when assisting someone with dementia. While often an upsetting and frustrating experience, it’s important to understand why this behavior is occurring in order to handle it properly.

Key to this, is discovering what triggers the outbursts. The most common triggers include unfamiliar surroundings, physical discomfort and fear. So what should you do and what actions should you avoid?

DO: Try to identify what is at the root of the behavior and find a way to remedy the situation, keeping in mind that different things work for different people. For some people, talking calmly and gently touching them, helps to soothe – for others, it increases aggression. Another course of action is to ensure that they aren’t in harm’s way and simply walk away and give them the chance to calm themselves.

DON’T: Under no circumstances should you become confrontational or try and force your loved one to do whatever they are refusing to do. This will only escalate the situation.

How to manage a confused dementia patient

Because dementia affects the memory, confusion about time, places and people are common. People with dementia can easily become fearful or uncertain when they don’t recognize someone or their environment.

DO: Try simple explanations accompanied by familiar things such as photographs, favorite items or even scents. Remember your aim is to try help your loved one feel safe and in control, even if it means delaying an activity or social gathering until they feel comfortable.

DON’T: Don’t use lengthy explanations or reasoning to overcome these moments of confusion, as they simply aren’t effective. Short, to the point explanations or even therapeutic white lies are the fastest and most effective way of calming and helping your loved one – which is the priority during these moments.

Expert Memory Care and Support Services

At United Methodist Homes of New Jersey, we offer support services and assisted living communities specifically for Alzheimer’s and dementia residents in environments that deliver the highest quality of life. An individualized care plan, developed for each resident, addresses their unique needs and level of independence and focuses on everyday routines like cooking, gardening, socializing, setting the table and other common tasks within a community lifestyle. These memory care programs also include activities for general wellness such as fitness, music and other sensory-rich activities suited to your loved one’s enjoyment.

Our residences are designed to be comfortable and homey, encouraging independence while supplying essential support and onsite medical care. For more information on our memory support services for Alzheimer’s and dementia, please contact the nearest UMH today:

UMH Bristol Glen in Sussex County, NJ: (973) 300-5788

UMH Collingswood Manor in Camden County, NJ: (856) 854-4331

UMH Francis Asbury Manor in Monmouth County, NJ: (732) 774-1316

UMH Pitman Manor in Gloucester County, NJ: (856) 589-7800

UMH The Shores in Cape May County, NJ: 609-399-8505

 

For more information, please visit www.umh-nj.org.

 

This content was originally posted at http://www.umh-nj.org/blog/what-are-the-essential-dos-and-donts-of-dementia-care/

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How to Fight Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s disease is a form of dementia which primarily affects the parts of the brain that control memory, resulting in progressive and permanent neurological damage. The disease affects more than 5 million Americans. While research continues to bring us closer to effective treatments, there are additional steps that patients, their families and caregivers can take to help fight this condition.

  1. Physical exercise: Engaging in a healthy amount of physical activity has significant health benefits for the brain as well as the heart, vascular system and body’s physical strength. Studies have shown that exercise can stimulate the brain’s ability to maintain older neural networks as well as stimulate new connections. It’s recommended that people over 65 years of age do 40 minutes a day of aerobic (e.g., walking or water aerobics) or non-aerobic exercise (e.g., stretching and toning muscles) to experience the full benefits.
  2. Mental exercise: A healthy body is important, but so is an active mind. Just like a muscle, the brain needs to be regularly challenged in order to maintain a healthy level of cognitive function. Stimulation is also vital to maintaining cognitive pathways and building new connections. Some of the best forms of mental stimulation include reading, doing crossword puzzles, playing games, social interaction and social activities such as going to museums or community events.
  3. Diet: Research has shown that certain foods can help keep the brain healthy while others can be harmful to cognitive health. A diet rich in lots of fruit, fish oil, legumes, vegetables (especially broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables) and whole grains is recommended. Foods such as saturated fats and refined carbohydrates (like white sugar) should be avoided, as studies indicate these foods may assist cognitive decline, especially in the areas of the brain focused on learning and memory.
  4. Early diagnosis: Knowing the signs of early onset Alzheimer’s, working on mental and physical health, as well as having access to professional and medical assistance will help ensure your loved one is kept comfortable, healthy and independent for as long as possible. An early diagnosis will allow caregivers to start implementing the best measures available as soon as possible.

Memory care and support services at UMH New Jersey 

Housed in Assisted Living, the memory care and support residences at UMH are specially designed to support individuals with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. By focusing on  customized care plans and activities within our comfortable apartment-style communities, we maximize your loved one’s dignity and quality of life .

To find out more about our services for Alzheimer’s residents, please contact UMH today or visit www.umh-nj.org.

This content was originally posted at http://www.umh-nj.org/blog/how-to-fight-alzheimers-disease/

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